Neil Young Homegrown - anyone else getting this?

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toomanyhatz
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Re: Neil Young Homegrown - anyone else getting this?

Postby toomanyhatz » 22 Jun 2020, 17:56

Listened a few times over the weekend; deliberating whether to purchase (probably on vinyl).

Not sure where it ranks among his 70s albums (most likely pretty close to the bottom), but it's 70s Neil Young, so even if it's not at the highest level, it's still essential.

And I don't hate "Florida." Generally speaking, wherever Neil wanted to go (back then, anyway), I was up for. It's certainly nothing any of his contemporaries would've attempted, which to me makes it a good thing.
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Re: Neil Young Homegrown - anyone else getting this?

Postby Matt Wilson » 24 Jun 2020, 01:00

I like it. Almost half of the album has been heard on other releases (though not always in these versions). I can ignore the spoken-word "Florida" easily enough, and the other new-to-me songs all sound fine to these ears. Had this been released at the time I'd probably rank it higher than something like American Stars & Bars or Comes a Time later on. As it is I like it better than Long May You Run now.

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Re: Neil Young Homegrown - anyone else getting this?

Postby Neil Jung » 24 Jun 2020, 08:43

Diamond Dog wrote:I was distinctly underwhelmed and whilst I will give it a chance I somehow doubt I'll be playing it in a month's time. Or after that . It just sounds like Neil on autopilot from that early-mid 70's period and whilst it's more inclined towards "Harvest" than "Zuma" it doesn't really do nearly enough to sustain my interest, sadly. And, yes, I do think it sounds as if he was channeling his past without much care for invention - winging it. It's pleasant enough but, ultimately, a bit lazy and I can see why it remained unreleased for 45 years.


Pretty much sums up my thoughts too.
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Re: Neil Young Homegrown - anyone else getting this?

Postby Sam Stone » 24 Jun 2020, 08:52

Matt Wilson wrote:

As it is I like it better than Long May You Run now.



The largely unloved runt of our Neil's otherwise consistently robust 1970s litter

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Re: Neil Young Homegrown - anyone else getting this?

Postby bobzilla77 » 25 Jun 2020, 22:40

Though Baron posted my long form review from the LA Beat above - thanks! - I've played it a few more times and have a few more thoughts.

I would have to say, if there was gonna be one Neil album that got yanked out of the catalog and left on the floor from his 70s output, this would be the one. I think he saved the ones that were essential to save.

And it will never mean as much to us as most of those other albums, because we're not who we were when Neil Young's albums first hit us. The songs that have resonated with us for decades will surely mean more to us.

It has its weaknesses, though I don't think Florida is among them. It's bonkers, and I usually forward through it. I might delete it from my mp3 player. But I wouldn't think the album was improved without it. It really is a snapshot.

Every song is really a snapshot from a distinct part of the emotional journey. Seperate Ways is acceptance, Love is a Rose is wistful remembrance of the good times, Vacancy is raw anger, Star of Bethlehem is total empty desolation, Try is the wish for reconciliation, Mexico is feeling the need to escape, Kansas is about screwing some girl he met last night, and then the weed songs are about getting out of it. I feel like, once he wrote those songs and realized them, they were no longer useful to him.

Bob Mould said about Zen Arcade, that having written those songs that came out of that intense anger and torment, he couldn't being himself to put himself in that place again by singing those songs live. They had outlived their usefulness. I imagine that's what happened to Neil here.
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Re: Neil Young Homegrown - anyone else getting this?

Postby bobzilla77 » 25 Jun 2020, 22:46

It's instructive to compare the lyrics on this to the ones from Zuma, made maybe 6 or 8 months later. He's getting his mojo back on that one. Now it's, you're just a STUPID GIRL. I saw you in my nightmares but I'll see you in my dreams, and wow, is that fucked up or what? You can fuck me if you want, baby, but don't plan on spending the night. I call the shots and I want to wake up with no one around. And now I can obsess on other things, like the god damn AZTECS! What was up with THOSE PEOPLE?!

After being a little worried about him for three or four albums. I woulda heard that and said, OK, Neil's gonna be all right.
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Re: Neil Young Homegrown - anyone else getting this?

Postby Mike Boom » 26 Jun 2020, 22:55

Yeah, I'm really enjoying it, as someone who pawed over the Tonights the Night inserts its kinda fun to hear Florida, we always wondered what the hell that and Waterface was all about.
Already being familiar with Love is a Rose and Homegrown obviously takes something away from the whole thing, but Im glad to have it, and its playing a lot round my place.

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Re: Neil Young Homegrown - anyone else getting this?

Postby LMG » 27 Jun 2020, 10:10

bobzilla77 wrote:I feel like, once he wrote those songs and realized them, they were no longer useful to him.


This is a very interesting post for me, in its entirety.

I have to say that of all the artists I have loved and whose careers I have followed, Neil Young springs to mind as the one whom I really would say I have absolutely no insight into his thinking, or what motivates him - I can seldom understand why he does what he does, and most of his career and indeed personal decisions seem strange to me, incomprehensible.

I mean 'Funny how some things that start spontaneously end that way. Eat a peach, Neil'... 'Let's go on tour and get death threats and folks can boo us - it's necessary for the country - well, not my country, obviously, but let's do it anyways'... 'I'm going to record my next album in this phone booth over here'...'I see myself in movies - more as a cameraman, really', 'My new album's called Greendale, now see the thing about Granpa...'

So it is fascinating seeing someone feel that degree of sympathetic understanding of any part of his career. For me, Neil Young is the artist on the planet who I would be the least surprised to learn that he originally came from another one.
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Re: Neil Young Homegrown - anyone else getting this?

Postby Sam Stone » 27 Jun 2020, 10:50

LMG wrote:
bobzilla77 wrote:
I feel like, once he wrote those songs and realized them, they were no longer useful to him.


This is a very interesting post for me, in its entirety.

I have to say that of all the artists I have loved and whose careers I have followed, Neil Young springs to mind as the one whom I really would say I have absolutely no insight into his thinking, or what motivates him - I can seldom understand why he does what he does, and most of his career and indeed personal decisions seem strange to me, incomprehensible.

I mean 'Funny how some things that start spontaneously end that way. Eat a peach, Neil'... 'Let's go on tour and get death threats and folks can boo us - it's necessary for the country - well, not my country, obviously, but let's do it anyways'... 'I'm going to record my next album in this phone booth over here'...'I see myself in movies - more as a cameraman, really', 'My new album's called Greendale, now see the thing about Granpa...'

So it is fascinating seeing someone feel that degree of sympathetic understanding of any part of his career. For me, Neil Young is the artist on the planet who I would be the least surprised to learn that he originally came from another one.



With the exception of Dylan (and to a lesser extent Bowie), there's probably never been a more capricious/quixotic artist.

Following up two mega-selling albums from the early 70s with a live album full of gloomy songs audiences at the gigs had never heard must have taken huge cojones - as did his subsequent making of similar swerves for much of the next 40 years.

While I haven't bought every new release NY has put out this last "Decade", I'd never miss a chance to see him live; an area where only Springsteen really runs him close. Seeing him from the third row at Hammersmith Odeon on 1976's Zuma tour remains one of the two or three best gigs I've ever seen

On the CD/album front, I was counting up my NY CDs and albums yesterday and was amazed to find I had about 40 of his 48 (or so) official releases plus about 100 boots of live shows and studio outtakes. The only outright stinkers I have are ReActor and Hawks and Doves from when NY was concentrating on trying to nurse Zeke in the early 80s. Ultimately, it's the fact that NY is unafraid to make such mis-steps and that even even his worst clunkers are more fascinating than many other artists's classics are what makes him a truly great artist.

I'll be first in line at the store when (if!) Archives II (and the long-delayed Ragged Glory deluxe edition) ever come out, and first online for tickets if he ever gets over to Europe to do any more live shows.