10 albums in 10 days - Day 6

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Mike Boom
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10 albums in 10 days - Day 6

Postby Mike Boom » 01 May 2020, 12:47

3rd/Sister Lovers - Day 6

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Fast foward to the early nineties. As this was the first Big Star record I got, I really had no idea what it was I was getting, one of those albums bought while browsing thru the record store racks just because it looked interesting and had an interesting cover, as you do, but once I got it home and listened to it I was of course stunned, confused, gobsmacked, astounded, etc etc etc What the fuck is this ? Over the next little while I went back to the store and got every other Big Star album I could find and have been listening to all them regularly ever since. Things like Kanga Roo, Holocaust, Big Black Car, haunting songs of decay and loss that just serve to make the things like Stroke it Noel, and especially Take Care, shine even more brightly. A record of extremes, the brilliance of the songwriting shines thru the ramshackle nature of the recordings. An intensely personal record, at least to me, and one I could never be without. The “not really an album” by a “not really a band” that was “never really finished”, and what a glorious, beautiful mess it is.

if your eyes are wide
And all words aside
Take care, please, take care

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Charlie O.
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Re: 10 albums in 10 days - Day 6

Postby Charlie O. » 01 May 2020, 12:55

^ I was strongly considering that for one of my ten! I might do it yet, but... you've said pretty much everything I was gonna.
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Darkness_Fish
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Re: 10 albums in 10 days - Day 6

Postby Darkness_Fish » 01 May 2020, 13:27

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One of my all-time favourite albums, which I bought from a record fair in Liverpool for a tenner, my first experience of a band who've been a staple ever since. There are moments of deep beauty (such as the strings on Ostia), and moments of just weird shonkiness. And it's all brilliant. Unlike most 'experimental' musicians, Coil had the money to spend on high-end studio equipment, due to Pete Christophersons tv ad & music video income, so as well as the ideas, they had the equipment and studio nous to carry them off. Their later albums are probably more consistent, especially towards the very end of their existence, but this one remains really special to me.
Last edited by Darkness_Fish on 01 May 2020, 21:51, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: 10 albums in 10 days - Day 6

Postby robertff » 01 May 2020, 14:32

Are we still following the original premise - the 10 albums that influenced the music we listen to or has it mutated into our ten favourite albums? No matter I'll stick with the original premise.


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I was 13 when the film came out and desperate to see it. At the time I was still a day boy, before becoming a boarder, and able to watch Top of the Pops and all that so I was very aware of the Beatles.

The first time I remember being really aware of them was when they released 'From Me To You', don't have conscious memory of Please Please Me and Love Me Do being released, (had lived in Australia for 3 years and came back during the winter of '63), so missed these releases. So my first introduction to the Beatles was 'From Me To You' and I absolutely loved it. I used to go round the playground singing it at the top of my voice, loved it, loved the Beatles. At the time they had a really profound impact on my life, like so many others I guess.

The 'Hard Days Night' film came out just before the summer holidays of 1964 and I couldn't wait to see it, was desperate.

Unfortunately, coming back from Australia and starting a new school during the middle of a school year, meant that educationally I was quite far behind and, having been very much an out door kid in Australia, the kind of stuff I was expected to learn didn't really interest me. So a year and a bit later I wasn't doing vey well educationally, didn't bother making an effort with the work and so my end of summer term 1964 report read like the very worst school report ever. I very well remember one comment: ' Robert (should be surname here, not christian name) is playground minded and until his attitude to work changes he will not improve'.

Needless to say my, very strict and cold towards me, father decided that I needed to be punished. So guess the punishment - he wouldn't allow me to see the film! I was just so upset. That very night my sister and mother went off to see the film whilst I had to sit at home and do school work. To this day I can remember that feeling.

Anyway, this was the first Beatles L.P. that I really got to know well and what a superb album it is, every track is great, every track a Lennon and McCartney original, no room for George's songs or a song for Ringo to sing - just sheer class. They may have produced more influential albums a few years later but this is the one that captured my imagination and the whole Beatlemania thing that went with it, loved the music, loved the cultural times. More to the point, the impact they made with their music and their attitudes opened the doors to a vast upsurge and explosion in pop music of all kinds, music that I got to like because of their influence.

Didn't get to see the film until some years later when it came on TV.

.

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Re: 10 albums in 10 days - Day 6

Postby Darkness_Fish » 01 May 2020, 14:56

robertff wrote:Are we still following the original premise - the 10 albums that influenced the music we listen to or has it mutated into our ten favourite albums?

Mine's done in chronological order, of when I encountered the albums that most influenced the music I listen to. Only Day 5's Clock DVA album would actually be a contender for my all-time top 10.
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Re: 10 albums in 10 days - Day 6

Postby Jumper K » 01 May 2020, 15:39

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The album that re-ignited my passion for hardcore punk rock. The first album by a bunch of reprobates from the LA underground scene thrust together to escape their predestined dire fate of failure, drug and alcohol addiction and either jail or death.

Its an assault on the senses from the opening scream of Heart Attack American and then proceeds to get even more intense, even more angry and even more brutal until the final come down of strobe Life and a frankly ballsy cover of X's Los Angeles. It excites me to this day, the purity of the music, the pain expressed in the lyrics, the sheer abandon. Its a short, sharp, assault to the brain that leaves me spent and sated after every listen. I'm finding it hard to express how powerful it is to me without descending completely into cliché.

An adjunct. What it does surprisingly have is an inherent grasp of melody, and the secret lies within Matt Caughthran's voice. The band would later record 3 Mariachi records, the first 2 are great by the way, and its Matt's vocals to the fore - soulful, emotive and joyous. The qualities are even evident in the manic thrash of this album. The guitar work, although in the hardcore tradition, has some recognisable surf inflection, as a result of Joby J's LA roots. Joby's side band Pounded by Surf would take this a step further with an album mashing up surf rock with cowboy themes and a Morricone obsession.

Back to the matter in hand. I can honestly say I play this record at least monthly, and at times many more than that. Its not going to be for everyone, hell I wish it was, but secretly also wish that it remains MY record. I could not live without this record. It has accompanied me through bad times, depths I would not care to experience again but has been a constant comfort to me. Its the power of music, the lowest, but highest artform for me. Imagine that! I'm getting emotional about a shitty punk rock record.

Turn it up loud, let it draw you in and then succumb to the relentless noise. They would never make a better album and there are 5 of them. Its a bleak nihilism that makes you want to move your body, let off steam and come out the other side purged and ready to take life on again with a refreshed fuck you attitude. It offers little hope but there is a hint of things that might change in the future. But don't bank on it.

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Re: 10 albums in 10 days - Day 6

Postby C » 01 May 2020, 15:56

robertff wrote:Are we still following the original premise - the 10 albums that influenced the music we listen to or has it mutated into our ten favourite albums? No matter I'll stick with the original premise.


Image


I was 13 when the film came out and desperate to see it. At the time I was still a day boy, before becoming a boarder, and able to watch Top of the Pops and all that so I was very aware of the Beatles.

The first time I remember being really aware of them was when they released 'From Me To You', don't have conscious memory of Please Please Me and Love Me Do being released, (had lived in Australia for 3 years and came back during the winter of '63), so missed these releases. So my first introduction to the Beatles was 'From Me To You' and I absolutely loved it. I used to go round the playground singing it at the top of my voice, loved it, loved the Beatles. At the time they had a really profound impact on my life, like so many others I guess.

The 'Hard Days Night' film came out just before the summer holidays of 1964 and I couldn't wait to see it, was desperate.

Unfortunately, coming back from Australia and starting a new school during the middle of a school year, meant that educationally I was quite far behind and, having been very much an out door kid in Australia, the kind of stuff I was expected to learn didn't really interest me. So a year and a bit later I wasn't doing vey well educationally, didn't bother making an effort with the work and so my end of summer term 1964 report read like the very worst school report ever. I very well remember one comment: ' Robert (should be surname here, not christian name) is playground minded and until his attitude to work changes he will not improve'.

Needless to say my, very strict and cold towards me, father decided that I needed to be punished. So guess the punishment - he wouldn't allow me to see the film! I was just so upset. That very night my sister and mother went off to see the film whilst I had to sit at home and do school work. To this day I can remember that feeling.

Anyway, this was the first Beatles L.P. that I really got to know well and what a superb album it is, every track is great, every track a Lennon and McCartney original, no room for George's songs or a song for Ringo to sing - just sheer class. They may have produced more influential albums a few years later but this is the one that captured my imagination and the whole Beatlemania thing that went with it, loved the music, loved the cultural times. More to the point, the impact they made with their music and their attitudes opened the doors to a vast upsurge and explosion in pop music of all kinds, music that I got to like because of their influence.

Didn't get to see the film until some years later when it came on TV.

.


It is indeed, a superb album Rob






.
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Re: 10 albums in 10 days - Day 6

Postby John aka Josh » 01 May 2020, 20:09

robertff wrote:Are we still following the original premise - the 10 albums that influenced the music we listen to or has it mutated into our ten favourite albums? No matter I'll stick with the original premise.



I'm trying to go with the original premise.



Very much enjoying your contributions by the way. Your also spot on about AHDN, it's a joy and there are times when it's my favourite Fab's album.
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Re: 10 albums in 10 days - Day 6

Postby Charlie O. » 03 May 2020, 07:06

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This Is Benny Goodman, Vol. II

As a very little kid, I heard a Goodman record or two from my parents' small collection of LPs... once or twice. Likewise Dave Brubeck, Earl "Fatha" Hines, maybe one or two other jazzbos. But my older brothers and I - well, my brothers, mainly, at that point - dominated the family Motorola. And we liked rock, basically. That was all that really excited us.

As noted in a previous thread in this series, I saw the light re: classical at age 5.

When I was 7 going on 8, my dad was having a birthday, and I'd seen the above double-LP - all recordings from the mid-'30s through the early '40s - at the PX for a reasonable price and decided to get it for him. When I gave it to him, he seemed pleased, and suggested we listen to it together. I don't think I was thrilled with the prospect but - hey, it was his birthday, so I agreed. By that time us brothers had long since gotten our own record players and I remember we settled down in my brother Jon's room to play it on his stereo. (That memory puzzles me now - Jon wasn't there, and Dad and I could just as easily have played the record in my room...)

Anyway, it was my Road To Damascus moment for jazz... and just as importantly for the pop music of my parents' generation, which had meant nothing (if not worse than that) to me up 'til then. 'Cause I really dug this!

I don't know if I could at that point connect it to early rock & roll - that would have been improbably perceptive of me, especially since I didn't really know any pre-Beatles rock & roll until I heard the American Graffiti soundtrack the following year - but I know I did think that Goodman's band kinda rocked. They had these real syncopated horn charts - and they had Gene Krupa on drums, and occasionally Goodman would let him show off a little; I loved that.

I really liked the songs, too; this is where I first heard "Blue Skies", "I Can't Give You Anything But Love", "Basin Street Blues", "It's Been So Long", "Goodbye"... somehow it all resonated with me.

And that proved to be beneficial to my relationship with my parents. Not that there was anything wrong with that relationship before, but nonetheless... music's a real good way to bridge generation gaps. I remember a few years later watching TV with the folks; a Goodman concert was on PBS. He was playing "Sing, Sing, Sing" (not on the above album) and I said something like "I wonder if they're gonna play it for twelve minutes, like at the 1938 Carnegie Hall concert." Mom burst into laughter and said "I love you, Charlie! How many other ten-year-olds would know that Benny Goodman played 'Sing, Sing, Sing' for twelve minutes at Carnegie Hall?!" I was a little embarrassed, but it was nice, too.
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Re: 10 albums in 10 days - Day 6

Postby Dr. Baron » 09 May 2020, 17:05

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R.E.M.'s Murmur was released in April 1983. I was finishing up 3rd Grade (age 9). Probably my academic peak. I wouldn't become aware of the band for another five years or so and wouldn't have one of their records for another 6. As has been noted, my first real rock and roll show was R.E.M. on the Green Tour in San Antonio with Alison, my oldest friend in the world.

I can't overstate that band's importance to me when I was a teenager, as my adult identity was being shaped. For a time, so many choices I made were guided by R.E.M., who seemed to me to be models of how a person of my sensibilities lives a sane, happy life as a southerner. (I'm talking about the band, Michael Stipe would have been like one of my more artistic friends). Eventually, in the haphazard way you do, I made my way through their catalog backwards and found Murmur. I must've bought it at the record store where I would eventually work because I distinctly remember the price in blue marker on the shrinkwrap of the cd.

I liked all their records leading up to Green, but they never topped Murmur, which is a complete and perfect statement (beginning with the cover art). Here, a mostly fun, party time band with some artistic pretensions, dropped a very different record that sounds like nothing else, before or since. It is a perfect expression of what makes them unique and is focused by an almost hermetically sealed unity of sound and feeling characteristic of other singular records (Loveless, Midnight Marauders, etc.). It is of its time and place, but is always a breath of fresh air, even now that we're creeping up on its 40th Birthday.

In a previous post I suggested that the Stone Roses came to me as aliens, with no context. But when I heard this record, I felt like I understood everything about it, in my bones. It captured a time and place I understood completely. Or I felt that I did. In a certain world of records (that, of course, not everyone is interested in) it stands alone. I think it's perfect.
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Re: 10 albums in 10 days - Day 6

Postby Charlie O. » 09 May 2020, 17:14

Heck yeah, Baron!
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Re: 10 albums in 10 days - Day 6

Postby Dr. Baron » 09 May 2020, 17:19

Charlie O. wrote:Heck yeah, Baron!


;)

I should clarify that I've liked records after Green, but I was speaking in the post of that time, when it was their latest record, and I was combing through the back catalog.
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take5_d_shorterer wrote:If John Bonham simply didn't listen to enough Tommy Johnson or Blind Willie Mctell, that's his doing.

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Re: 10 albums in 10 days - Day 6

Postby Hightea » 04 Jun 2020, 02:23

Dr. Baron wrote:
Charlie O. wrote:Heck yeah, Baron!


;)

I should clarify that I've liked records after Green, but I was speaking in the post of that time, when it was their latest record, and I was combing through the back catalog.

100% with you nice write up. Since this was going to be one of my albums maybe I'll skip REM :(
They were my College years and our group of friends played them to death. They played our College on the Murmur tour (although saw them for one song at Shea Stadium) and were amazing although they hated it because not enough people showed up although I blame them it was mid September.

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Re: 10 albums in 10 days - Day 6

Postby Hightea » 04 Jun 2020, 03:05

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In late 76 my mom moved us across town after a summer at the Jersey shore. We didn't know the neighborhood kids so the first few months I only knew one guy who could hang out on a school night I was in 7th grade :lol: He was in 9th grade and really only liked two bands Frank Zappa, who could have made this list and the Grateful Dead. After an epic first summer of concerts I finally got to see the Dead. It was an Epic show and made Dicks Picks Vol #15. While the third disc is a little over 50 minutes that was easily close to two hours. Still listening to live dead let alone plenty of other jam like bands(not all).

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Re: 10 albums in 10 days - Day 6

Postby C » 04 Jun 2020, 09:28

Hightea wrote:Image

In late 76 my mom moved us across town after a summer at the Jersey shore. We didn't know the neighborhood kids so the first few months I only knew one guy who could hang out on a school night I was in 7th grade :lol: He was in 9th grade and really only liked two bands Frank Zappa, who could have made this list and the Grateful Dead. After an epic first summer of concerts I finally got to see the Dead. It was an Epic show and made Dicks Picks Vol #15. While the third disc is a little over 50 minutes that was easily close to two hours. Still listening to live dead let alone plenty of other jam like bands(not all).


7th grade that's about 12/13 years old I think.

Impressive.










I love a bit of Dead me.

This is a great set


NP

Image









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Re: 10 albums in 10 days - Day 6

Postby Hightea » 05 Jun 2020, 04:43

C wrote:
Hightea wrote:Image

In late 76 my mom moved us across town after a summer at the Jersey shore. We didn't know the neighborhood kids so the first few months I only knew one guy who could hang out on a school night I was in 7th grade :lol: He was in 9th grade and really only liked two bands Frank Zappa, who could have made this list and the Grateful Dead. After an epic first summer of concerts I finally got to see the Dead. It was an Epic show and made Dicks Picks Vol #15. While the third disc is a little over 50 minutes that was easily close to two hours. Still listening to live dead let alone plenty of other jam like bands(not all).


7th grade that's about 12/13 years old I think.

Impressive.










I love a bit of Dead me.

This is a great set


NP

Image





.

Yes know that set tape amazing era - although I'm far from a deadhead.

Yes 13! Dec Birthday only saw Nektar at Age 12 (by a few days)
My brother was 7 years older than me and at College not far away and was head of Concerts - my friends were 3 years older than me and we took the bus my mom was fine with it being it was my brother. Saw a few shows that winter (Boston, Billy Joel, New Riders(with Roger McGuinn opener). City shows didn't start until that summer mom bought a new car and drove us to MSG for Led Zeppelin and yes it sucked. :lol: PF a month later :D