Louis Armstrong

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GoogaMooga
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Louis Armstrong

Postby GoogaMooga » 27 Oct 2019, 21:42

Louis Armstrong's Hot Five and Hot Seven recordings are the Rosetta Stone of popular music. Sure, there were forerunners: Scott Joplin, Jelly Roll Morton, King Oliver, Kid Ory, Fletcher Henderson, among others, but none of them came close to having as great an influence as Satchmo. Not by a long shot. The core of the greatest Armstrong was recorded in the period 1925-1928. Here you can hear his most brilliant trumpet playing, how he revolutionized jazz and became the most important recording artist of the 20th century (along with Elvis Presley on vocals, of course). He was not really born on the 4th of July, 1900, as he often claimed. It wasn't until the mid-80s, however, that his real date of birth became known: August 4, 1901. Still, it's a nice urban legend. From 1947 on, he became the goodwill ambassador of jazz, playing sold-out concerts around the world with his six-piece band. He died in 1971, but not before becoming a pop star as well, with songs like "We Have All the Time in the World", "Hello Dolly", and "What a Wonderful World." He may very well have been the first musician I knew by name as a little boy, such was his fame and popularity. But he was not only the most influential and the most famous, he also became the most accessible, universally loved for his winning personality. Detractors said he sold out, but like any artist, he had every right to move forward, change with the times, and explore new styles and venues.

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Flower
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Re: Louis Armstrong

Postby Flower » 28 Oct 2019, 11:27

I can take Louis in small doses ... I've always been amazed at his stature, from his voice, I'd think that he would be a much taller man.

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soundchaser
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Re: Louis Armstrong

Postby soundchaser » 28 Oct 2019, 19:30

GoogaMooga wrote:Louis Armstrong's Hot Five and Hot Seven recordings are the Rosetta Stone of popular music. Sure, there were forerunners: Scott Joplin, Jelly Roll Morton, King Oliver, Kid Ory, Fletcher Henderson, among others, but none of them came close to having as great an influence as Satchmo. Not by a long shot. The core of the greatest Armstrong was recorded in the period 1925-1928. Here you can hear his most brilliant trumpet playing, how he revolutionized jazz and became the most important recording artist of the 20th century (along with Elvis Presley on vocals, of course). He was not really born on the 4th of July, 1900, as he often claimed. It wasn't until the mid-80s, however, that his real date of birth became known: August 4, 1901. Still, it's a nice urban legend. From 1947 on, he became the goodwill ambassador of jazz, playing sold-out concerts around the world with his six-piece band. He died in 1971, but not before becoming a pop star as well, with songs like "We Have All the Time in the World", "Hello Dolly", and "What a Wonderful World." He may very well have been the first musician I knew by name as a little boy, such was his fame and popularity. But he was not only the most influential and the most famous, he also became the most accessible, universally loved for his winning personality. Detractors said he sold out, but like any artist, he had every right to move forward, change with the times, and explore new styles and venues.

Image


Can you put up a link to one of your favourite songs from his core period? I remember him very well in the 1960s when I was a child, but have never really listened that carefully to his trumpet playing, as I’m not really a jazz fan. My 12 year old grandson is already a very good trumpet player, with a great musical future ahead of him. I’d like to show him something by the best. Thanks.

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Jimbo
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Re: Louis Armstrong

Postby Jimbo » 28 Oct 2019, 19:32

I have found I have little patience for old timey scratchy recordings that's why I like my Louis in stereo like on the amazingly listenable Hello Dolly album.
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GoogaMooga
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Re: Louis Armstrong

Postby GoogaMooga » 28 Oct 2019, 20:12

The 1928 Hot Five line-up's "St. James Infirmary" is one of the greatest things ever. Sure you know it by Bobby Blue Bland. "West End Blues" is another biggie.



1925 Hot Five is improvisational, whereas 1928 Hot Five is arranged.

The 1925 Hot Five is famous for "Muskrat Ramble".

Hot Seven had their "Melancholy Blues" sent into space on the Voyager.

"When the desert comes, people will be sad; just as Cannery Row was sad when all the pilchards were caught and canned and eaten." - John Steinbeck

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soundchaser
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Re: Louis Armstrong

Postby soundchaser » 29 Oct 2019, 07:49

Thanks for posting, I appreciate it. I’ll be sure to pass it on. I liked Melancholy Blues best.