Kliche - "Supertanker"

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GoogaMooga
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Kliche - "Supertanker"

Postby GoogaMooga » 19 Sep 2019, 19:00

Kliche's debut from 1980, "Supertanker", is a milestone in Danish rock history. Quite simply a masterpiece, the most perfectly realized new wave album ever recorded in Denmark. Gone are the political lyrics of seventies rock, this is a minimalist album extolling the virtues of modernity and the beauty of machines, performed with a terseness and ambiguity that is informed by bands like Kraftwerk and other apostles of alienation. Kliche's special sound was no accident, rather it came about by default, to compensate for the band members' lack of technical skill. They had to create a sound that would click with the jaded listeners, a sound that could match their ambitions while hiding their ineptitude. Thus we got the minimalism, a minimalism that pumps hard and still holds up today. Kliche lasted for only two albums, but what albums! Top marks for "Supertanker".

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"When the desert comes, people will be sad; just as Cannery Row was sad when all the pilchards were caught and canned and eaten." - John Steinbeck

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Count Machuki
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Re: Kliche - "Supertanker"

Postby Count Machuki » 01 Oct 2019, 17:19

I played this today and was startled to find that it's very good indeed.
Let U be the set of all united sets, K be the set of the kids and D be the set of things divided.
Then it follows that ∀ k ∈ K: K ∈ U ⇒ k ∉ D

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GoogaMooga
custodian of oldies
Posts: 25884
Joined: 28 Sep 2010, 05:23
Location: Denmark

Re: Kliche - "Supertanker"

Postby GoogaMooga » 01 Oct 2019, 19:42

Count Machuki wrote:I played this today and was startled to find that it's very good indeed.


I am glad that you took time to play it and that you like it. :)
"When the desert comes, people will be sad; just as Cannery Row was sad when all the pilchards were caught and canned and eaten." - John Steinbeck