NME Top Singles of 1995

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Whippet Tuesday Challenge

Black Grape - Reverend Black Grape
2
3%
Supergrass - Alright
9
12%
Pulp - Sorted For E's And Wizz
9
12%
Oasis - Some Might Say
8
11%
Foo Fighters - This Is Is A Call
4
5%
Oasis - Wonderwall
2
3%
McAlmont & Butler - Yes
8
11%
Pulp - Common People
17
23%
Blur - The Universal
8
11%
The T.U.C. - Waterfalls
7
9%
 
Total votes: 74

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Deebank
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Re: NME Top Singles of 1995

Postby Deebank » 11 Oct 2018, 12:55

The Modernist wrote:Yeah but bands are always saying that kind of thing about each other. There's a lot of competition and rivalry, young guys a bit full of themselves etc. I tend to take it with a pinch of salt. And Coxon probably said a lot of things when he was pissed up!
I suppose Albarn will always face that kind of criticism though because of the kind of artist he is. Like Bowie, his radar is always alert for things he can use for a new sound or direction.


You can hear the Pulp influence in the keyboards for one thing - I'd have to trawl the Pulp back catalogue to nail it down and I can't be arsed :)
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Re: NME Top Singles of 1995

Postby The Modernist » 11 Oct 2018, 12:57

Deebank wrote:
The Modernist wrote:
Deebank wrote:
Note to Moddie - Country House was on The Great Escape wasn't it?


Yes - I didn't suggest otherwise? :?



I thought you were saying Parklife ended up sounding tawdry with the likes of Country House...


No - I meant that the cycle of music which began with the "Modern Life.." album ended up with tawdry, gimmicky songs like "Country House". Apparently Albarn claimed it was meant to be a trilogy or something, but that just seems to be an arty spin on 'let's milk this formula dry".

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Re: NME Top Singles of 1995

Postby The Modernist » 11 Oct 2018, 13:02

When "Girls & Boys" came out, I really liked its sound -which reminded me of that kind of new wave meets disco sound you had around 78 & 79. I don't know if I had a specific reference point for it as such, it reminded me most of Squeeze singles like "Slap & Tickle" and "Take Me I'm Yours".

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Re: NME Top Singles of 1995

Postby Dor-Relip Hotels and Bathings » 11 Oct 2018, 13:02

The Modernist wrote:I wouldn't say 'Girls & Boys' sounds particularly like Pulp though..which songs are you thinking of?


It sounds a wee bit like 'Countdown'
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Re: NME Top Singles of 1995

Postby Dor-Relip Hotels and Bathings » 11 Oct 2018, 13:06

The Modernist wrote:
Deebank wrote:
The Modernist wrote:
Yes - I didn't suggest otherwise? :?



I thought you were saying Parklife ended up sounding tawdry with the likes of Country House...


No - I meant that the cycle of music which began with the "Modern Life.." album ended up with tawdry, gimmicky songs like "Country House". Apparently Albarn claimed it was meant to be a trilogy or something, but that just seems to be an arty spin on 'let's milk this formula dry".


And then he famously looked to America for influence, and the next two or three Blur albums were dreary, tune-free rubbish.
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Re: NME Top Singles of 1995

Postby The Modernist » 11 Oct 2018, 13:13

HEN wrote:
The Modernist wrote:I wouldn't say 'Girls & Boys' sounds particularly like Pulp though..which songs are you thinking of?


It sounds a wee bit like 'Countdown'


Just played it, I didn't know the track.
It does a bit yeah, but it's also funny to hear Pulp jumping aboard the Italia-House/Garage bandwagon that was happening at the time.

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Re: NME Top Singles of 1995

Postby Dor-Relip Hotels and Bathings » 11 Oct 2018, 13:25

but making it more palatable :)
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Re: NME Top Singles of 1995

Postby sloopjohnc » 11 Oct 2018, 16:44

HEN wrote:
sloopjohnc wrote:What is this "Britpop" of which you discuss?


Retro, parochial, and somewhat silly - these days, it seems nobody has a good word to say about Britpop. At the time, however, it felt like a breath of fresh air, as we kicked against the monolithic nature of grunge with the most tuneful music to come off these shores for more than a decade. It had been rumbling for a while, with the Stone Roses, the Las, and Suede all producing high-calibre debut albums from the turn of the decade with a peculiarly British feel, a relatively 'delicate' nature, and an attention to melody.

Britpop's big four - Oasis, Blur, Pulp, and Supergrass - all hit big in 1994 and produced albums that both delighted the critics and sold bucketloads. Their music drew largely on '60s pop with dashes of other styles (especially punk and glam - and the influence of the Smiths loomed large) - but I suppose there was a kind of purism there, in that, at least initially, all these bands appeared to reject anything that wasn't pop. The experimentation - if indeed there was any - came later. In some ways, this was liberating and refreshing - for a while at least.

Many bands kicked against the faintly ludicrous 'definitions' of Britpop in order to assert their individuality, but by dint of them being in the right place at the right time, ended up under the same Union Jack umbrella anyway. Most famous of these bands was perhaps Echobelly, who featured a black female guitarist who was often seen wearing a T-shirt with the slogan 'My Country Too', and an Asian female singer.

By 1997 'The Scene That Celebrates Itself' had become 'The Scene That Nobody Wants To Be Part Of', and we were left with grinning-ninny bands like Cast, Kula Shaker, and Space. But it was good while it lasted. Wasn't it?

viewtopic.php?f=1&t=53383


I was kidding. I know what it is. I'm always interested that you guys/gals had that kind of reaction to it when only a smidgeon made its way over here.

Especially, when America usually has such a fondness for music from the UK, like we did in the '60s, '70s and '80s. Maybe folks over here were too consumed with grunge to care. But I remember bands like Nirvana, Tad, etc., being pretty popular over there when they first toured.

Was there really that big a negative reaction to it? Grunge seemed to be a pretty lazy description as you had so many different sounding bands originally from one region that seemed to exemplify it: Soundgarden, Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Mudhoney.
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Re: NME Top Singles of 1995

Postby sloopjohnc » 11 Oct 2018, 16:46

PENK wrote:Pulp, meanwhile, didn't have too much to do with '60s pop; they were more the inverse of glam, shabby and tawdry with Cocker playing Bryan Ferry's seedier, less popular cousin. They were far more intellectual than their peers, despite Albarn's desire to be a renaissance lad. And they had, of course, been around for a decade already.


That's a good description.
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Re: NME Top Singles of 1995

Postby Butch Manly » 11 Oct 2018, 19:19

HEN wrote:
But since when did 'Alright' fall out of favour?


Since it became the soundtrack to a billion adverts/"amusing" news items/"lighthearted" montages on TV travel shows etc.
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