Significant loss of producer

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Quaco
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Significant loss of producer

Postby Quaco » 12 Sep 2018, 01:28

Do you think it's telling/significant that ...

1) It's Only Rock and Roll was the first Rolling Stones album in a long time not produced by Jimmy Miller?
2) A Day at the Races was the first Queen album (besides the first) that was not produced by Roy Thomas Baker?
3) Let It Be was the only Beatles album not produced by George Martin?


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Re: Significant loss of producer

Postby Charlie O. » 12 Sep 2018, 01:39

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Re: Significant loss of producer

Postby Charlie O. » 12 Sep 2018, 01:40

Muscle Of Love was the first Alice Cooper album in a while to not be produced by Bob Ezrin, who had helmed all of their commercially successful records to that point. This album was produced by his boss, Jack Richardson, whose approach seems to have been rather "hands off" compared to Ezrin's. The album sold reasonably well, but compared to the Ezrin quartet it was a flop, and deserved to be. (Truthfully, I blame the band more than Richardson. But I think Ezrin would have made them do better, if they had let him.) The band split up shortly thereafter, and their eponymous lead singer went on to make Welcome To My Nightmare with Bob Ezrin.
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Re: Significant loss of producer

Postby Loki » 12 Sep 2018, 06:07

Charlie O. wrote:Muscle Of Love was the first Alice Cooper album in a while to not be produced by Bob Ezrin


First one I thought of.
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Re: Significant loss of producer

Postby Davey the Fat Boy » 12 Sep 2018, 09:26

Nilsson’s firing of Rick Jarrad was the beginning of problems for him. It was masked initially by his successful teaming up with Richard Perry. But Perry couldn’t keep Nilsson focused for more than one an a half albums. After that, Nilsson was mostly out in the wilderness producer-wise for the remainder of his career.
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Re: Significant loss of producer

Postby Diamond Dog » 12 Sep 2018, 09:36

Quaco wrote:Do you think it's telling/significant that ...
2) A Day at the Races was the first Queen album (besides the first) that was not produced by Roy Thomas Baker?


Are you saying you don't like the production on that Jimmy? I think it's excellent and almost completely in keeping with "A Night At the Opera" and those before that.
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Re: Significant loss of producer

Postby Quaco » 12 Sep 2018, 16:14

Diamond Dog wrote:
Quaco wrote:Do you think it's telling/significant that ...
2) A Day at the Races was the first Queen album (besides the first) that was not produced by Roy Thomas Baker?

Are you saying you don't like the production on that Jimmy? I think it's excellent and almost completely in keeping with "A Night At the Opera" and those before that.

I love it actually, but it does seem different. No more between-song segues, the stage goes black after each scene. The songs are a little longer and more self-contained, no more snippets, less of a rush. The album cover/title helped bridge the gap and make it seem more alike than different.

A couple songs are less than stellar, but it's mostly very good, and some of the songs are beyond stellar!
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Re: Significant loss of producer

Postby Diamond Dog » 12 Sep 2018, 16:25

Quaco wrote:
Diamond Dog wrote:
Quaco wrote:Do you think it's telling/significant that ...
2) A Day at the Races was the first Queen album (besides the first) that was not produced by Roy Thomas Baker?

Are you saying you don't like the production on that Jimmy? I think it's excellent and almost completely in keeping with "A Night At the Opera" and those before that.

I love it actually, but it does seem different. No more between-song segues, the stage goes black after each scene. The songs are a little longer and more self-contained, no more snippets, less of a rush. The album cover/title helped bridge the gap and make it seem more alike than different.

A couple songs are less than stellar, but it's mostly very good, and some of the songs are beyond stellar!


Right. I think the second side is mighty - maybe their finest. The first side suffers a bit but that's the songs, not the production. Although I have to say I'd not noticed the lack of segues, which is odd! To be honest, if I didn't know it wasn't a RTB production, I'm not sure I;d have noticed!
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Re: Significant loss of producer

Postby Geezee » 12 Sep 2018, 17:24

I guess the break-up with Visconti is partially to blame for 80s Bowie.
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Re: Significant loss of producer

Postby Snarfyguy » 12 Sep 2018, 19:20

Desmond Dekker/Leslie Kong

After Kong died, the magic was sort of gone.
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Re: Significant loss of producer

Postby bobzilla77 » 12 Sep 2018, 19:22

The Who seem to me to be largely produced by Pete Townshend after their debut. Kit Lambert had no audio expertise and was mostly greasing the wheels for Pete's ideas. Glyn John's and Ron Nevison were more like great engineers who recorded them well. Face Dances is the first one since My Generation that had a strong willed, creative type producer on board. It's a disappointing album but I wonder how it would have been different if they didn't deliberately hire a hitmaker producer. Or hired someone other than the Eagles' producer
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Re: Significant loss of producer

Postby Tactful Cactus » 12 Sep 2018, 21:35

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Re: Significant loss of producer

Postby Tactful Cactus » 12 Sep 2018, 21:35

Quaco wrote:3) Let It Be was the only Beatles album not produced by George Martin?


He walked out of the White Album sessions for a period and life carried on, the album was not ruined. I think his presence and influence is exaggerated. I mean to call your book "All You Need is Ears" just seems arrogant. He was in the right place at the right time and he had the good sense to not hinder them.

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Re: Significant loss of producer

Postby Bent Fabric » 12 Sep 2018, 22:10

There is a fair amount of testimony from people who were there that Martin was quite aggressive in cultivating/fixing his reputation as "the one guy without whom they couldn't have done it".

As he aged (and, admittedly, settled into the fruits of that reputation), I think he mellowed quite a bit on this point - but it is also safe to say that (thanks to his own efforts) he could afford to.

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Re: Significant loss of producer

Postby sloopjohnc » 12 Sep 2018, 23:09

Tactful Cactus wrote:
Quaco wrote:3) Let It Be was the only Beatles album not produced by George Martin?


He walked out of the White Album sessions for a period and life carried on, the album was not ruined.


I thought it was Emerick that walked out and Chris Thomas took over.

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Re: Significant loss of producer

Postby Bent Fabric » 12 Sep 2018, 23:22

Emerick walked out. Martin went on holiday without telling the band.

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Re: Significant loss of producer

Postby Sneelock » 13 Sep 2018, 00:33

it sure seems like R.T. Baker did "Races" and it sure seems like Ken Scott did Supertramp's "Even in the Quietest Moments" but both were by other hands. I think you could make a case both albums are informed by people who didn't have a hand in making them.

So, do you think the bands found a simpatico producer or do you think the bands pretty much knew what suggestions they might get from the not present producers and if they'd like them or not?

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Re: Significant loss of producer

Postby Snarfyguy » 13 Sep 2018, 04:16

Quaco wrote:Do you think it's telling/significant that It's Only Rock and Roll was the first Rolling Stones album in a long time not produced by Jimmy Miller?

But yet their first mis-step (with the benefit of hindsight) was Goats Head Soup (which really is only half-bad, but still significantly worse than its predecessors). Perhaps they were entering a period of decline which neither Miller nor his immediate successors -- the Glimmer Twins themselves -- could forestall.
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Re: Significant loss of producer

Postby caramba » 13 Sep 2018, 10:56

Charlie O. wrote:Muscle Of Love was the first Alice Cooper album in a while to not be produced by Bob Ezrin, who had helmed all of their commercially successful records to that point. This album was produced by his boss, Jack Richardson, whose approach seems to have been rather "hands off" compared to Ezrin's. The album sold reasonably well, but compared to the Ezrin quartet it was a flop, and deserved to be. (Truthfully, I blame the band more than Richardson. But I think Ezrin would have made them do better, if they had let him.) The band split up shortly thereafter, and their eponymous lead singer went on to make Welcome To My Nightmare with Bob Ezrin.



Hasn't AC been pretty consistent in claiming over the years that he and the band were pretty much burnt out by that point

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Re: Significant loss of producer

Postby Charlie O. » 13 Sep 2018, 16:57

caramba wrote:Hasn't AC been pretty consistent in claiming over the years that he and the band were pretty much burnt out by that point

Yeah - like I say, it isn't really Richardson's fault. But I do think Ezrin could've pulled a little more out of them.
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