BCB 130 - Creedence Clearwater Revival

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Re: BCB 130 - Creedence Clearwater Revival

Postby Phenomenal Cat » 12 Aug 2014, 16:22

Bent Fabric wrote:ANYHOW - life goes on...I discovered "Up Around The Bend" via a rather unremarkable cover version from Hanoi Rocks (boy, talk about a band that NEVER lived up to advance billing)...and remember publicly insisting that it was superior to the original (it never was - as Charlie says, that shredding guitar tone is just so fucking sweet).


That we both heard (and loved) that Hanoi Rocks cover tells me there must have been something there. I listen to it now and I realize that what they were doing was no different than the early Stones selling R&B back to American kids. That's the sound we were attuned to, and this was plainly the best song Hanoi Rocks possessed. It wasn't until maybe ten years back that the whole Creedence thing slapped me around and shamed me into repudiating a good fifteen years of my listening life. Really - Doug Clifford couldn't possibly hold a candle to Red Hot Chili Peppers drummer #1, 2, or 3. Silly me.

Doug "Cosmo" Clifford. That great lumbering beast. The Backwoods Bonham (or is that redundant?) Man, is that guy ropey, maybe even slightly dense. And the perfect guy for CCR. I've posted a clip of Doug playing at Woodstock at BCB before - I had no idea there was so much attack in the Clifford Arsenal. Now I listen to something like "I Heard It Through the Grapevine" and I realize the guy is a bit mad. Imagine how his cymbals feel. But Dougie's part of that chooglin' machine. My epiphany came those many years ago when I saw/heard a Creedence cover band and the drummer just stomped all over everything. In a live setting, when a band hasn't settled into anything resembling a groove, it is painfully obvious. And I know what he was doing. He was playing like "This ain't Red Hot Chili Peppers. I got this. Let's just pound 'em out." Silly fool. I could have fucking killed him.
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Re: BCB 130 - Creedence Clearwater Revival

Postby Snarfyguy » 12 Aug 2014, 22:41



Greatest one-chord jam ever?
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Re: BCB 130 - Creedence Clearwater Revival

Postby Snarfyguy » 12 Aug 2014, 22:54

take5_d_shorterer wrote:This tune has an author about as much as the Mississippi River has an author. This disappearing act in which no one can figure out who wrote the song is extremely difficult to pull off. Bob Dylan, for all his ability and interest in folk music, never accomplished this. Robbie Robertson is not even close. Robertson, in fact, is so far away from this that I don't even feel confident in claiming that he understands what it means for a folk song be without an author. In the songs that Robertson supposedly wrote, you can hear the explicit references to the 19th century. In the CCR song above, there is no consciousness of the 19th century, nothing to give you a guide that we are or are not in the 19th century. I looked at the Mississippi River near Memphis. If you stand at the right spot so that you can't see the buildings, you probably can't tell either what century you're in. That's starting to approach where Fogerty was at.

Mrs. SG Happened to be in the Bay Area when Bill Graham passed and went to the memorial concert in Golden Gate Park, I guess it was. Fogerty took the stage and modestly announced he was going to play a song he wrote, which was "Proud Mary," and she described a sort of collective "Holy fuck, this guy actually wrote this song" sense of recognition, or enhanced understanding coming from the audience. Because you can really take that song for granted. It seems like it's just always been there, and teasing that out of the ether takes some kind of genius.

Writing songs is hard work, but writing a song that everybody's always known forever is way beyond normal songwriting.
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Re: BCB 130 - Creedence Clearwater Revival

Postby C » 13 Aug 2014, 04:15

I love Creedence - all their albums are excellent up to and including Pendulum

Difficult to identify a 'best' album but Willy, Green River and Cosmo's are my fave three - probably in that order.

As well are all aware, this is delightfully robust also:

Image








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Re: BCB 130 - Creedence Clearwater Revival

Postby kath » 13 Aug 2014, 21:34

niiiiiiiiiice, baron. oh yes.

of course, i'm a creedence freakazoa. where i come from, they were always beluvved and beplayed regularly on the radio and on friends' stereos. my swampland adopted them whole-heartedly as bayou boys, even though they weren't bayou-born. they were pretty uniformly considered swampy at heart. sigh.

we had a sync listen some time back for willy. yummmm. and yeah, cosmo's factory is closest to my heart (so sorry, mwhaha) but that's becuz it was my first CCR album, handed to me, as usual, by my older brother, who was my primary album pusherman.

there's just sumthin... sumthin REAL about john fogerty. sumthin.. core. no, i can't explain that, and i don't care that i can't.

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Re: BCB 130 - Creedence Clearwater Revival

Postby sloopjohnc » 13 Aug 2014, 22:39

Phenomenal Cat wrote:Nice one, Baron! Green River sits atop the pile for me. The shout-out to "Effigy" puts us in good stead. When people start to talk up The Band, I always feel this tinge of defiance - They're good but they're no CCR. And CCR is about as fake and inauthentic pose as you can get. They're a band outta Frisco.

Fucking love 'em. I think Fogerty has one of the Top Five voices in Rock. Maybe Top Three. Is Lennon better? I dunno. For three years they could do no wrong. They'd never be The Beatles. Why would they want to?


Green River for me too and I agree with you on Fogerty.

People on BCB here have scoffed but I think Dylan, Fogerty and Brian Wilson match Jagger/Richards and Lennon/McCartney on many fronts as '60s songwriters - and that makes it four against three.

In fourth grade, I remember our teacher let us bring in music one day during the week. Brian Baker brought in his big brother's new copy of Cosmo's Factory. When his brother found out he borrowed it without asking, he beat the shit out of Brian. He came to school the next day with a black eye.

When Ike and Tina cover your songs, that's pretty good company.

No one has built a persona like Fogerty, the suburban kid from El Cerrito, who made himself into the bayou poet.

El Cerrito

Image

The Bayou

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Re: BCB 130 - Creedence Clearwater Revival

Postby The Write Profile » 15 Aug 2014, 11:50

The G Experience! wrote:Of all the big bands, I came latest to them. I've no idea why, but you never heard them much (apart from 'Bad Moon Rising' ) on UK radio, so perhaps that was a part of it. I've really come to appreciate them in recent years though, although I still need to get to know the albums better. Difficult to say what makes them different to their peers, but a lot of it comes down to the elemental power that Fogerty brings. There have been few bands that communicate as directly as they do.


Absolutely. I also loved snarfy's remark that "Writing songs is hard work, but writing a song that everybody's always known forever is way beyond normal songwriting" is spot on.

Yet oddly, I can't think of many songwriters who were also able to seemingly catch a moment or spirit of the times ("Bad Moon Rising", "Fortunate Son", "Effigy" and "As Long As I See The Light" all reference Nixon or Vietnam in some way), but sound so weirdly timeless. He had this amazing gift for immersion. Also, it boggles the mind just how prolific and succesful they were in such a short period of time. As for the albums, here's something I prepared earlier:


Bayou Country
is probably their swampiest LP, and it's their first real sign of greatness- the dirty, filthy groove they conjure on "Born on the Bayou" is instinctive, but Fogerty's vocals are just freakish- how the hell do you sing like that? However he managed to conjure those demons is down to him alone, as is a song like "Proud Mary": so easy, so natural, so deep that it sounds like it's always existed. I think the record gets a bit sloppy at times, certainly "Keep on Chooglin" is a good two minutes or so too long, but it's the first real sign that they have their own sound.

Green River is even better, it's arguably their tightest record, and there's a sense of darkness that looms throughout The title track sets the scene, but it's the howling "Tombstone Shadow", the downbeat "Lodi" and the ominous "Bad Moon Rising" that carry the record's emotional punch, and the sound is just right- sharp yet dirty, and without an ounce of fat on it. I even dig their cover of "Night-time is the Right Time."

Willy & the Poor Boys shuffles between reverie and indignation, and it's fair to say that by ending the record with "Effigy", indignation wins out. That closing track is astonishing, the way it turns on that suspended chord, the way Fogerty cries "why?" near the end tells you all you need to know. I can't think of anyone who wrote protest songs quite like Fogerty, maybe it's because his imagery was at once detailed yet concise, and maybe it's because he knew exactly when to go for the jugular- "Fortunate Son" wouldn't be half the song it was if it pulled punches. But the band knew how to have fun, and the playing throughout this record is superb, too, who knew that washboards could be so rock'n'roll before "Down on the Corner" came along? I think it's my favourite CCR LP.

Cosmo's Factory is their wiggiest, if only for the seven-minute "Ramble Tamble" which manages to get as much emotion and movement out of as few chords as possible, yet my favourite moments throughout are their most concise- whether it's the razor-wire attack of "Run through the Jungle", the screaming "Up Around the Bend" , or the amused, slightly distracted shuffle of "Lookin' Out My Back Door." Again, his protest songs ("Who'll Stop the Rain?" "Long As I See the Light") sound as universal as they are specific, not least because Fogerty sounds genuinely haunted and if their cover of "I Heard It Through The Grapevine" choogles too long, we'll forgive their indulgences this time. It's probably their last great record.

Pendulum has its moments, for sure, not least the nasty "Pagan Baby", the mournful yet defiant "Have You Ever Seen the Rain?" and the good time vibes of "Hey Tonight", but it's "only" very good to these ears, it lacks the sense of purpose of what went before, although the fact it was their fourth LP in 18 months is phenomenal in and of itself. Even allowing for the covers, how on earth did they manage to put out so many great records and singles in such a short timeframe? True, by Mardis Gras they had burned out, but few bands burnt as brightly as them.






CCR were important to me growing up, because as I've said before, on my family's first-ever trip to the South Island of NZ, the only tapes in the car were CCR's Chronicle and a collection of short stories by Roald Dahl. So, I oddly associate their music with the wide-open stretches of the South Island.
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Re: BCB 130 - Creedence Clearwater Revival

Postby LeBaron » 15 Aug 2014, 12:36

The Write Profile wrote:Bayou Country is probably their swampiest LP, and it's their first real sign of greatness- the dirty, filthy groove they conjure on "Born on the Bayou" is instinctive, but Fogerty's vocals are just freakish- how the hell do you sing like that? However he managed to conjure those demons is down to him alone, as is a song like "Proud Mary": so easy, so natural, so deep that it sounds like it's always existed. I think the record gets a bit sloppy at times, certainly "Keep on Chooglin" is a good two minutes or so too long, but it's the first real sign that they have their own sound.

Green River is even better, it's arguably their tightest record, and there's a sense of darkness that looms throughout The title track sets the scene, but it's the howling "Tombstone Shadow", the downbeat "Lodi" and the ominous "Bad Moon Rising" that carry the record's emotional punch, and the sound is just right- sharp yet dirty, and without an ounce of fat on it. I even dig their cover of "Night-time is the Right Time."

Willy & the Poor Boys shuffles between reverie and indignation, and it's fair to say that by ending the record with "Effigy", indignation wins out.


That's what I wanted to say!
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Re: BCB 130 - Creedence Clearwater Revival

Postby soundchaser » 15 Aug 2014, 12:54

Great post Profile: I shall revisit these albums with your words in mind.

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Re: BCB 130 - Creedence Clearwater Revival

Postby Pool Hall Richard » 15 Aug 2014, 13:49

Think my ideal job would've been the bass player in CCR. Such a cool band, cool songs to play. Must've been the many pub gigs ive been to where i've heard their songs covered. Not sure it would've been such a financially rewarding position but would've been fun for a while. Perhaps.

I have the cd's but dont really know the albums well enough. Fave song - I love the rockers, all of them but Long as I can see the light is stunning. I always long for John Fogerty to shout "play 1 more" to the sax player as he comes to the end of his solo, they should've extended it, perhaps in concert they would've had a sax player toured with them. But thats just in my head when I listen to the song on my ipod.

I think there's a good book on their history somewhere. Can anyone recommend one to read?

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Re: BCB 130 - Creedence Clearwater Revival

Postby Guy E » 15 Aug 2014, 15:26

Baron of the Flies wrote:Speaking of those five records, they really cranked them out, didn’t they? Wiki says, CCR was in July ’68, Bayou Country was in January ’69, Green River in August ’69, Willy in November ’69, and Cosmo’s in July ’70. That’s how lots of bands did it, but it’s still pretty unreal.

Yeah, you practically needed a subscription to keep up.

Great post Baron. And I'm with you on Cosmos Factory... many great songs, but somehow less satisfying as an LP.
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Re: BCB 130 - Creedence Clearwater Revival

Postby LeBaron » 06 Jul 2015, 18:51

I don't know about you, but it's July where I live. Drove into work this afternoon with big clouds overhead, offering illusory hopes of rain to wash away the heat and humidity.

Popped Bayou Country into the CD player as I rolled up The MoPac Loop, and I'll be doggoned if "Born On the Bayou" didn't sound like the greatest music ever. Try it, you'll like it!
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Re: BCB 130 - Creedence Clearwater Revival

Postby gash on ignore » 06 Jul 2015, 19:04

Is there a BCBer who doesn't dig 'em?

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Re: BCB 130 - Creedence Clearwater Revival

Postby der nister » 06 Jul 2015, 19:31

neville harp wrote:Is there a BCBer who doesn't dig 'em?

Elemental.


penk, probably

and after a paragraph or two maybe, possibly rayge, but it's hard to tell usually :lol:
It's kinda depressing for a music forum to be proud of not knowing musicians.

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Re: BCB 130 - Creedence Clearwater Revival

Postby Six String » 07 Jul 2015, 07:02

Great opening post Baron as well as several others here. I'll try to add something that hasn't been said but that will not be easy. They are really elemental as G and some others stated. Even for my ancient self they were there on AM radio from the time I was paying attention to such a thing. My earliest memory was Suzie Q. It was the single but if you had a cool radio station or jukebox then you had the long (album) version with the extended guitar work out. CCR's first album was one of my personal first long players. It was probably in my first ten or so I believe. I got it in one of those Columbia House Record Club Deals. Along with this I got Deep Purple's In Rock, Free's Fire And Water to name a few to get the idea of the competition.
The band was part of the summer soundtrack for a few years running. I was slow to purchasing a lot of their music because it seemed to be everywhere. If it wasn't on the radio, someone owned it so I never felt a need to own it until later.

Today I own all of the lps except Mardi Grass. I don't need it but I enjoy the others to this day. I pulled them all out so I've been spinning them from time to time over the last twenty four hours. I ended up living real close to a lot of the Creedence landmarks somehow. Lodi is a small farm town about forty miles south. The "Green River" is supposedly Putah Creek, a body of water that runs through Yolo County towards Clear Lake. Berkeley is of course where Fantasy Recording Studio is and also the practice space where the cover of Cosmo was taken and that is about 80 minutes due West.

Edit:I have to go with Baron's choice on best song (Born On the Bayou). I'm a sucker for good tremolo and that simply a superb
example of the effect.

The guitar playing on I Put A Spell On You is chilling and psychedelic at the same time. Jerry Garcia or John Cippolina would be proud of the feedback Fogerty was getting back then. His voice and his guitar were perfect for those songs. And those songs.
Another great thing about those songs is that they were easy to learn. They were pretty basic chords so bar bands could play those songs. They were pretty ubiquitous back then. I think being able to play them easily also helped spread their music too but they were perfect for the radio and the juke box no doubt.

Good songs, skilled playing and singing....what else do you need?

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Re: BCB 130 - Creedence Clearwater Revival

Postby PENK » 13 Jul 2015, 11:01

der nister wrote:
neville harp wrote:Is there a BCBer who doesn't dig 'em?

Elemental.


penk, probably


Nah, I like them. Not the biggest fan, the Chronicle suffices, but I do an awesome karaoke 'Proud Mary'.
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Re: BCB 130 - Creedence Clearwater Revival

Postby Rayge » 13 Jul 2015, 11:21

neville harp wrote:Is there a BCBer who doesn't dig 'em?


I'm not fussed, you won't be surprised to hear, but I don't see the point of coming in on a 130 post and being critical. I only opened this one up because I was wondering why it had been bumped. I liked some singles in the 1960s, and one or two a lot. That's it.
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Re: BCB 130 - Creedence Clearwater Revival

Postby pcqgod » 14 Jul 2015, 03:58

I've been listening to Chronicle, Willie and Green River for decades now but only recently have checked out the first two. The extended psychedelic guitar soloing really caught me off guard.
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Re: BCB 130 - Creedence Clearwater Revival

Postby pcqgod » 13 Mar 2018, 17:29

Bump for posterity.
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Re: BCB 130 - Creedence Clearwater Revival

Postby fange » 14 Mar 2018, 00:10

PENK wrote:
der nister wrote:
neville harp wrote:Is there a BCBer who doesn't dig 'em?

Elemental.


penk, probably


Nah, I like them. Not the biggest fan, the Chronicle suffices, but I do an awesome karaoke 'Proud Mary'.

*cough*
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