Stuff from old magazines and whatnot

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Re: Stuff from old magazines and whatnot

Postby Phenomenal Cat » 09 May 2014, 17:12

Gotta bump this thread.
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Re: Stuff from old magazines and whatnot

Postby Charlie O. » 11 May 2014, 04:22

Alright, then! More Stones, more FLIP's Groovy Guide To The Groops! (Signet, 1968). An excerpt:

Mick likes driving alone in the middle of the night - although the chances are that now he'll have Marianne Faithfull at his side during these drives. Marianne, who is the first singer to record on the Stones' own label (Mother Earth Records), is Mick's steady girl.

OK, Mr. Collies, maybe you can tell me this: what's the deal with Mother Earth Records? I'm pretty sure this is the only reference to it that I've ever seen. If it had happened (I'm assuming that it didn't), it might have beat Apple Records to the marketplace. How far along did they get with the idea? Who else were they thinking of signing? Et cetera.

More excerpts:

Brian has three very intense dislikes - public transport, ants, and cruelty.

Keith is the only Stone who's changed his name. His real name is Keith Richards and, for some reason, Keith decided to drop the "s". Everything else about Keith is real - including his dislike for two-faced people.

Offer Bill some marmalade, and he'll turn green. Offer him some fresh cashew nuts, and he'll be your friend for life (or at least until he's through eating them!). Along with marmalade, Bill can't stand traveling, arguments, and getting home after 3 A.M. Astronomy and books rank as close seconds to his favorite cashew nuts. Bill often joins Mick on the group's vocals, which are as hard-driving as ever.





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Re: Stuff from old magazines and whatnot

Postby harvey k-tel » 12 May 2014, 18:13

Charlie O. wrote:Alright, then! More Stones, more FLIP's Groovy Guide To The Groops! (Signet, 1968). An excerpt:

Mick likes driving alone in the middle of the night - although the chances are that now he'll have Marianne Faithfull at his side during these drives. Marianne, who is the first singer to record on the Stones' own label (Mother Earth Records), is Mick's steady girl.

OK, Mr. Collies, maybe you can tell me this: what's the deal with Mother Earth Records? I'm pretty sure this is the only reference to it that I've ever seen. If it had happened (I'm assuming that it didn't), it might have beat Apple Records to the marketplace. How far along did they get with the idea? Who else were they thinking of signing? Et cetera.



This thread might shine a little light on it.
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Re: Stuff from old magazines and whatnot

Postby Phenomenal Cat » 12 May 2014, 18:31

This is the first I've heard about this!
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Re: Stuff from old magazines and whatnot

Postby Charlie O. » 12 May 2014, 20:25

Harvey K-Tel wrote:This thread might shine a little light on it.

Good man, Harv!

Interesting that the Stones wouldn't have appeared on the label because they were signed to Decca... but that Marianne would have, even though she was already signed to... Decca.
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Re: Stuff from old magazines and whatnot

Postby Charlie O. » 12 May 2014, 20:34

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Re: Stuff from old magazines and whatnot

Postby Charlie O. » 17 Jun 2014, 23:54

Musician Magazine, December 1984: Robert Fripp and Andy Summers tell Vic Garbarini about their new video...

FRIPP: It was filmed in the Holloway Sanitarium, which was built in 1877 for the curably insane middle class of England...

MUSICIAN: How apt.

FRIPP: One of the intriguing things as you walk in through the entrance hall is the painting done by the London School Of Art, I believe, in 1900. Although I don't think they realized what they were doing, they painted a whole scene of demons all over the walls. It's really horrible and profanely disturbing, and anyone with any sensitivity at all - let alone someone who's having a little bit of difficulty with their mental life - finds it utterly unnerving. However, you go on from there into the hall where we had a long table set up. Myself in the role of master of the house was immovable and unprovokable and deadpan, while Andrew the butler tried to provoke me. There was one particular scene where Andrew is bringing me my tea, past the monkey riding on the donkey, past Gene October in the role of the junkie slumped in a large chair with a stuffed black bear hovering over him and a live sheep tied to his chair...

SUMMERS: Defecating.

FRIPP: Oh, the poor animal was nervous, depositing stuff all over the floor. And there was also a goat on the table eating the Times, and when it finished the Times they gave it the Guardian. The animal handlers were holding the animals and as the camera approached they would run out of shot. Of course the animals would do things animals do, like open their bowels a little more. And the monkeys would do unbelievable things with themselves, and so on. I was also given tarantula crackers to eat. Fortunately, the tarantulas were dead. However, they were very real tarantulas and they were placed on cream cheese on crackers. One thing I didn't know was that the hairs from the legs of tarantulas fall off, and they fell into the cream cheese.

SUMMERS: Well, that's show business.

MUSICIAN: Sounds like you were trying to construct a microcosm of the music business...

SUMMERS: I think we made a statement.

FRIPP: The monkey did, too! When he'd had enough of riding the donkey they put him on the table and tied the sheep to my chair. The sheep, after the first hour or two, calmed down and grew to like me, and would only just dribble on my tux trousers. But the monkey would go "TCH TCH TCH TCH" and then empty itself on the table and then go "HUH HUH HUH HUH"...

MUSICIAN: Do the animals get residuals?

SUMMERS: They left residuals.



(The video, which is on YouTube, is more fun to read about than to watch. And more fun to watch than to listen to.)




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Re: Stuff from old magazines and whatnot

Postby der nister » 18 Jun 2014, 11:53

videos were considered so wondrous in the early 80s
they were even willing to make them for instrumentals:
It's kinda depressing for a music forum to be proud of not knowing musicians.

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Re: Stuff from old magazines and whatnot

Postby Charlie O. » 18 Jun 2014, 18:31

Well, Andrew was enjoying the last fleeting seconds of his 15 minutes of pop fame at the time...
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Re: Stuff from old magazines and whatnot

Postby der nister » 18 Jun 2014, 18:36

Charlie O. wrote:Well, Andrew was enjoying the last fleeting seconds of his 15 minutes of pop fame at the time...


I vaguely remember some of Summer's work
On IRS' Guitar Speaks series
Never checked out any full album
It's kinda depressing for a music forum to be proud of not knowing musicians.

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Re: Stuff from old magazines and whatnot

Postby Charlie O. » 16 Sep 2014, 05:50

"I love the idea that I've come up being just a kid who had his eyes set on something, and that I went even beyond what I set out to do. I know I'm going to go on into the movies, and when I do, I'll be going beyond what I've done already. That's my incentive in life. I might just stop flat and try to become a golf pro. I never can tell what I really want to do. But if I did become a golf pro, I bet you that I'd get more publicity than anybody else. I can sing rock and roll as good as anyone, but that's certainly not what I want to do for the next ten years. I'd like to endorse products. You can make just as much money endorsing as you can singing."
      - Alice Cooper in December 1973, interviewed by Bob Greene, from Billion Dollar Baby




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Re: Stuff from old magazines and whatnot

Postby robertff » 16 Sep 2014, 14:24

Wrong thread.

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Re: Stuff from old magazines and whatnot

Postby Charlie O. » 16 Sep 2014, 22:25

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Ian Whitcomb wrote:San Diego, The Holiday Inn

So looking forward to this tour. What a cast! the Beach Boys, Sam The Sham, the Righteous Brothers, the Kinks, Jan and Dean, and Sonny and Cher. Latter duo are another Jack Good discovery - they bugged Jack to get on Shindig until he finally admitted that Cher is very pretty and let them do a spot. With their crazy hair and furs and folk-rock songs, they're really making it, hitting the charts with "I Got You, Babe". Now they're regulars on the TV show. Before the tour, Sonny advised me to be considerate to fans but never to get too close to them, as they can turn nasty. He and Cher go out of their way to sign autographs, though.

[...] At the gig, which was an enormous gymnasium, Sonny introduced me to Sam The Sham. This was a great thrill, as I've grown to love "Wooly Bully", a quintessential pop record: mysterious words and a catchy voodoo chant. Sam is really Domingo Samudio of Dallas, Texas, and specializes in what's called "Tex-Mex" music. His group hardly says a word, but they appear to be nice Southern boys. For their act, they dress up in Eastern garb that looks like it's made from the curtains in my motel. Sam wears a beard, a gold tuxedo, and a turban. However, despite this exotic vaudeville appearance, Sam turns out to be an educated gentleman and he and I discussed the philosophy of John Locke while waiting in the locker room of the school's gym.

In a far corner, I noticed the Kinks, keeping to themselves. Mostly they muttered expletives, played cards, or ran nervy licks up and down their guitars. The chords they played seemed to be always the same: G/F/B flat - round and round and round. Eerie and disconcerting. [...] And when they dress up in their jolly huntsman costumes, the effect is bizarre, especially when one of Sam's Pharaohs is nearby. [...] The Kinks refused to appear on stage until they had been paid in cash. Eventually a bag of cash appeared.

[...]

Seattle, Washington, The Edgewater Inn:

[...] After San Diego, we did the fabulous Hollywood Bowl. How I wish I could have savored the glory and basked in the balm of applause. But no sooner was I onstage than I was off. I do remember that, during my act, the sound system broke down. So I kept the show going, in the grand old manner, by telling Max Miller music-hall jokes and also some pier stuff. Afterward, backstage, the local jocks said I did a "helluva job" covering up the problem and that I was a real "pro". But the Los Angeles Times review the next day said I was not worth the trip from Dublin. I was on the point of calling up the reviewer, a certain Charles (Chuck) Champlin, when Sonny Bono restrained me. He certainly knows the ropes.

After the Bowl, we were supposed to play the Cow Palace in San Francisco. [...] I was amazed to hear Sonny ask Cher, during dinner [the night before], whether she felt like making the Cow Palace gig, and to hear Cher say she wasn't going. Yet contracts had been signed. Obviously, I have much to learn. Phil Spector was eagling around, but nobody was paying him much attention. Apparently, he's not very hot at present. [...]

[...] I don't remember much about the Cow Palace performance itself. This work is getting to be a blur, just a job. I remember the usual high-pitched screeching. A contagious disease: they scream at the Beach Boys because they're stars, but they scream at me, I think, because I come from the same country as the Beatles and the Beatles come from God and maybe by being near me they can catch some reflected grace. I must say that, onstage, Dennis Wilson, the drummer, looked very scared and, when a teddy bear hit him in the face, he downed his sticks and rushed off. Overreacting, I thought. But he was followed by the rest of the Beach Boys and, on their way out of the Cow Palace, they grabbed me and we all bundled into their getaway Cadillac with one-way glass. No sign of Sonny and Cher on this show. Sam The Sham kindly gave me a copy of Thomas Hobbes' collected works before I went on. The Kinks continued to scowl and say not a word to me, but then I didn't say anything to them either.

In Seattle [...] there was violence in the air. The police were truculent and jeering. Jan (of Jan and Dean) wasn't recognized by one of the cops guarding the sports arena artists' entrance. Unable to get in, Jan socked the cop. I can begin to understand this kind of violence: when you're hyped up for an explosive rock 'n' roll performance, any little detail can detonate you. And after the show, when you've wriggled and shaken and gotten the girls excited and you've been told viscerally that you're godlike and yet you know in your head that what you sang was awful and that the band was terrible, that the mikes weren't working properly, and that the piano was just a matchbox - after all this cold realization, still the girls twitter and screech. It's beginning to piss me off, this complete lack of artistic discrimination. I feel like the Kinks. In fact, backstage, I smiled sarcastically at Ray Davies and he smiled crookedly back. We agreed that the whole game was a silly farce and that we would be Dadaists together.

So, full of rage, I returned to our tour hotel, a swank new place called the Edgewater. All day, a mother had been imploring me to autograph her daughter's cast and meet the girl. Finally, right after the act, I relented and followed the well-fed mother along the corridor to the suite. I was signing hard on the plaster cast on the girl's broken thigh when there was a commotion and, looking up, I saw a cop and a security guard. "OK, everybody out!" ordered the cop. "No adults in a juvenile's room." There had been a few tour gophers chewing the cud in the suite, but they immediately vanished. Being American, they knew the score. Calmly, I continued to sign the plaster - until a stomach blotted my view. "Hey, punk - you better git!" Through narrowed eyes, I regarded the fat blue officer. I said, "Don't you ever speak to me in that manner, my man. Remember you are a public servant!" "Wise guy, huh?" He and the security guard laid into me with punches, while I defended myself as best I could with my hardbound British passport. Within moments, they had me up against the wall and in handcuffs. [...] Luckily, Jerry Dennon [of Jerden Records, who had released Whitcomb's first 45s] was around and he sorted the matter out with some well chosen words, a few albums, and a spot of folding money. Is this the sort of thing that happens to Connie Francis? And it's my birthday, too. The feel of handcuffs is quite horrible, filling one with all manner of guilt for mysterious reasons.

        - Ian Whitcomb, Rock Odyssey: A Chronicle of the Sixties, Dolphin Books, 1983






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Re: Stuff from old magazines and whatnot

Postby the masked man » 16 Sep 2014, 22:43

Charlie O. wrote:A Young Rascal prognosticates prog, punk, and post-punk:

"The music is getting more complex and it's going to continue - in my opinion - to get more complex until it reaches that breaking point. It's evolving and evolving, and while we're still pretty far from it, eventually it will become just too much for the average kid to play. Then somebody will come along and put it down to three basic chords or four basic chords for a little excitement and it will all start again. And that will evolve."
    - Felix Cavaliere, quoted in Inside Pop by David Dachs (Scholastic Book Services, 1968)


That is brilliant! He managed to nail it perfectly, probably just pushing ideas out there. Good stuff!

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Re: Stuff from old magazines and whatnot

Postby Snarfyguy » 16 Sep 2014, 23:01

Thanks, Charlie. That's priceless stuff.

I have one or two books by Whitcomb, but I don't think that title's among them. I'll have to keep an eye out.
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Re: Stuff from old magazines and whatnot

Postby Charlie O. » 17 Sep 2014, 04:48

Another thing from the same book: Whitcomb claims that "Yellow Submarine" is based on a World War I-era ditty called "We All Live In A Pocket Battleship". I can find nothing on Google (let alone YouTube) about such a song.
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Re: Stuff from old magazines and whatnot

Postby slightbreeze » 17 Sep 2014, 10:48

N.M.E. JANUARY 1967

"BBC 1 institution "Juke Box Jury" has seven minutes cut from the Jan 7th edition. The show was recorded the previous weekend, with an all-DJ panel of Pete Murray, Alan Freeman, Jimmy Saville and Simon Dee. All four are reportedly shocked by the lyrical content of "The Addicted Man" by The Game. Murray comments "It’s the most disgusting record I’ve ever heard". The BBC decides to truncate the show owing to the ensuing outcry, even though the general public has yet to have a chance to hear the song. The Game’s Record Company, EMI, rapidly withdraws the record from release."

Must try and find this record ;)

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Re: Stuff from old magazines and whatnot

Postby Snarfyguy » 17 Sep 2014, 15:55

Good luck!

Meanwhile,

GoogaMooga wrote: The further away from home you go, the greater the risk of getting stuck there.

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Re: Stuff from old magazines and whatnot

Postby Charlie O. » 17 Sep 2014, 17:36

It's pretty obviously an anti-drug song. Must've been too subtle for that lot.

If they had objected on musical grounds, I could see it.
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